Matsumoto Sakichi, a pair of colored sake bottles with flying cranes figure

explanation of the work

On the surface of each sake bottle, three cranes, vertical stripes by black gosu, and flowers-connected pattern are painted with cool colors (green, yellow, purple and ultramarine) unique to ko-kutani. Looking at the paints, it seems to claim “these are the colors of ko-kutani.”

The creation of ao-kutani (cool colored kutani like ko-kutani) began before this creator, Matsumoto Sakichi started creating like ko-kutani in 1908. From around 1893, the first Tokuda Yasokichi trained under Matsumoto Sahei, and while Yasokichi was training, he began his efforts to reproduce the paints like ko-kutani. Since his paints were almost the same as that of ko-kutani, it changed to a big trend that many creators created ko-kutani style works one after another. One of them was Matsumoto Sakichi adopted by Matsumoto Sahei. It is strongly felt that this work was created by Sakichi with a strong passion for ko-kutani.

size: caliber about 1.9 cm, width about 7.2 cm, height about 16.6 cm

In this work, it can be seen that the design and the pattern seem to be inspired by one of masterpieces in ko-kutani. It is best seen in the dancing of the three cranes. In the lower half of the bottle, against vertical green background, the three appearances of flying crane were painted in yellow, purple, and ultramarine, and they fly lively, and on top of the cranes, a connecting pattern of purple flowers looks like auspicious cloud. These are good signs.

Then, what about the ko-kutani’s masterpiece is that against green background with green vertical stripes, a few cranes are flying beautifully in a circle and they are drawn with yellow, white and gosu lines. And violet spade patterns, which were rare at that time, are placed around. It is found that Sakichi drew with motifs such as cranes, vertical stripes on a green background, and purple spades.

It is said that a high degree of skill was required for molding of the beautiful, octagonal shape of guard. In the latter half of the Meiji period, such elaborate body was easily supplied to many porcelain painters. It is thought that molding by embossing became popular, as many excellent craftsmen of molding for embossing played an active role. The elaborate and high skill of molding can be seen in this work together with the painting.

The back name is written as “Sakichi” in the double square like “fortune (huku)” of ko-kutani. This writing style was rare in Meiji kutani. For that reason, it is believed that this creator had a strong passion for ko-kutani. In addition, there are a signature “Sakichi”and a red stamp “Sakichi” on the back of the lid of the wooden box.

creator of the work

The first Matsumoto Sakichi      松本 佐吉

born in 1884 and died in 1942

Matsumoto Sakichi learned porcelain painting from Matsumoto Sahei, who was the founder of the painting factory “Shoun-do”, and later Sakichi became one of his disciples. In 1903, Matsumoto Sahei moved the place of activity to Taniguchi Konyo-do in Kanazawa for some reason, so the painting factory continued to be run by his son, Matsumoto Sataro. In 1908, Matsumoto Sakichi was adopted by Sahei and took over the factory. It is said that Sakichi entrusted the factory management to Akiyama Komajiro, who was the chief craftsman of the factory, so Sakichi was able to continue to devote himself to the research of ko-kutani. For this reason, it is said that Sakichi could continue to have a strong passion for reproducing ko-kutani. So, later he became to be called the “master of ao -kutani”.

 

reference No. 18100617
date of exhibition January 7, 2020
price J-yen 14800
remarks original box

 

Higashi Bunkichi, five red and gold middle plates with figures and landscape

creator of the work

In the latter half of the Meiji period, the proportion of Kutani produced for the domestic market gradually increased, and some master craftsmen created tableware with a slightly high-class taste. Like these works, five or ten sets of the medium plates, which were served as both a large plate and a small plate, were also arranged as furniture for merchants, etc. It is said that these were sometimes used for gorgeous banquets or dining of a large family.

size: diameter about 14.6 cm, height about 3.8 cm

These plates are elaborately painted by the skill of a master craftsman, and are also finished as “tableware that could enjoy their eyes”. Each is divided into 4 panels to fill the surface, and the designs in each panel are the natural scenery of the seaside, the person sitting facing the sea and reading a book, and Daikoku god and Ebisu god of business sitting under the pine trees on the seaside. In particular, it seems that the expressive Daikoku and Ebisu might delight the eyes of the people who had dining.

These plates have not the delicacy of Kanazawa kutani, but it seems that these were made as a practical tableware. It is found that around the time when embossing molding became widespread, changes to meet demand could be seen in tableware, such as durable thick molding, shape to meet the use, and slightly recessed molding inside the foot to handle easily.

The back inscription is written in “Kutani / Toga” in a slightly recessed circle in the center of the foot.

creator of the work

Higashi Bunkichi  東 文吉

born in 1854), and died in 1913.

Higashi Bunkichi learned porcelain painting directly from Saita Dokai, and was later said to be a master of aka-e fine painting of “Dokai style”. On the other hand, he was well received because he also made excellent paintings on daily tableware as demand changed. He worked for painting factory run by the second Oda Jinzo, and it is also known that he worked for painting with Takada Ryozan and other master craftsmen.

 

reference No. 2006171
date of exhibition October 29, 2020
price sold out
remarks

Haruna Shigeharu, red and gold plate with scene of ordinary home garden

explanation of the work

A garden basket (basket for keeping poultry in the garden) is placed in the garden, and flowers are blooming around it. Such a peaceful scene that could be seen everywhere is drawn on the plate.

After Kutani Shoza often created the works that drew a rural scene, many master craftsmen such as Haruna Shigeharu realistically painted a scene that could be seen anytime, anywhere.

size ; diameter about 20.4 cm, height about 2.9 cm

Red painting stands out as a whole, and the design in the center of the plate is finely painted with red, and it is also decorated with gold and brocade like other Meiji kutani, so the everyday scene is a little gorgeous. No poultry can be found in or around the garden basket, and the garden at that era when it was normal to keep poultry in private homes is drawn with flowers.

The plate itself is thick, especially the back side is rugged, but without painting the back side with glaze, the flowers are drawn with a margin so as not to worry about that.

The back name is written as “kutani / created by Kacho-ken”. Other works with the back name “Kacho-ken” are inherited, or also masterpieces with “created by Kacho-ken Shigeharu”. However, it is unclear how Haruna used “Eisai-do” (栄生堂) and “Kacho-ken” properly.

creator of the work

Haruna Shigeharu  春名 繫春

born in 1847, and died in 1913

Haruna Shigeharu learned Japanese-style painting from former Kaga domain painter and porcelain painting from Toda Tokuji. After that, before and after working as a porcelain painter for the Abe Oumi kiln in Kanazawa between 1873 and 1876, Haruna exhibited his works in the Vienna World’s Fair in 1873, and the Philadelphia World’s Fair in 1876. After that, he created excellent works as a painter at the painting kiln managed by the pottery merchant Ennak Magohei, including a large brocade vase of 70 cm.

The reputation of Haruna Shigeharu was so high that it was named alongside Utsumi Kichizo in the early Meiji period, and became one of the master craftsmen of Kanazawa Kutani. His disciples included Yanagita Sozan, Shimada Hozan, etc.

Around 1882, he left Kanazawa and went to Yokohama to engage in Satsuma-style painting of Yokohama-yaki. In 1889, he was invited to the Tokyo Craftsman School as an exemplary craftsman and then he worked at Tokyo Higher Industrial School until 1902. During this time, he helped Gottfried Wagner for Asahi-yaki and published a magazine of designs.

After that, Haruna moved to Kyoto, created works at the Ceramics Research Institute, and was invited by the 9th Kinkozan (錦光山) as a design teacher. Kinkozan also exported colored pottery, so it is possible that Haruna was involved in the production and produced colorful colored pottery.

 

reference No. 191007107A
date of exhibition April 10, 2020
price sold out
remarks Images are posted with the kindness of the purchaser

Hatta Itsuzan, brocade small pot with a flower-and-bird figure and lid

explanation of the work

The small pot looks like a rather large teacup with lid, but it is believed that these small pots were exported to the Westerns for use to store candy and bonbons. The entire surface of the pot, including the lid, is decorated with a bird-and-flower figure and brocade patterns.

size ; body : caliber about 5.2 cm, height about 10.3 cm, lid : diameter about 6 cm

This bird-and-flower figure is drawn in details on the entire surface, as is often seen in the export kutani that Ennaka pioneered in the early Meiji period, so it has a taste like a Japanese-style painting and is finished to the detailed Meiji kutani.

The tab of the lid is shaped like a treasure ball for wishing, and the surface is covered with brocade. The pattern on the lid is drawn across the teacup, and it looks like auspicious clouds. The combination of a treasure ball and auspicious clouds shows that they are the best luck. It seems that this pot looks beautiful to the eyes of Westerners.

The back name is written as “produced by Ennaka / painted by Itsuzan”. Ennaka Magohei was one of the pioneering pottery merchants in the early and middle Meiji period, and it is said that Ennaka asked painters to quickly incorporate Western tastes into their porcelain painting.

creator of the work

About the creator of the work, search for “Hata Itsuzan, his work and history“.

 

reference No. 1911101A
date of exhibition September 27, 2020
price J-yen 21000
remarks wooden box

Hatta Itsuzan, red and gold bowl with peony figure and three legs

explanation of the work

 

What is drawn on this bowl, which stands firmly on its three legs, is a majestic large-flowered peony, and a bird perching on a branch with its head down seems look at the below peony. “Static and dynamic” is well expressed on it. The basic colors are “red and gold”, and the background is decorated with “ishime-uchi” (fine pointillism) that were popular until around 1890.

size: diameter about 24 cm, height (max) about 6.5 cm

The scene drawn in the center seems to draw the moment when a small bird has flew from somewhere, has just perched on a long peony branch, and while still holding on to the swaying branch, looks at the peony below. Although this scene is a bird-and-flower figure, it is strange to incorporate a wild bird that fly around lively instead of the peacock that accompanies peony. The export kutani had to respond to Japanese-style painting for the export in the early Meiji period, but this scene seems to be based on the originality of the creator or the pottery merchant.

On the back side, a slightly different, bright flower is drawn large. Compared to the details of the front side, it is drawn to decorate gorgeously with a slightly thicker line.

Export kutani of incense burners or vases with legs like karako (Chinese boys) or beasts are often seen, but it seems that it is rare to have legs attached to bowls. And the reason for choosing the legs like elephant head was probably that pottery merchant was asked for the legs like the head of the elephant familiar in the Westerns for use as a fruit bowl placed on the center of the table.

The back name is written as “kutani / Itsuzan” in the slightly recessed center surrounded by the three legs.

creator of the work

About the creator of the work, search for “Hata Itsuzan, his work and history“.

 

reference No. 191031119A
date of exhibition April 4, 2020
price sold out
remarks wooden box

Hatta Itsuzan, his works and history

Hatta Itsuzan, his works

red and gold bowl with peony figure and three legs

What is drawn on this bowl, which stands firmly on its three legs, is a majestic large-flowered peony, and a bird perching on a branch with its head down seems look at the below peony. (continued)

brocade small pot with a flower-and-bird figure and lid

The small pot looks like a rather large teacup with lid, but it is believed that these small pots were exported to the Westerns for use to store candy and bonbons. (continued)

 

Hatta Itsuzan, his history

Hatta Itsuzan 八田 逸山

The year of birth and death of Hatta Itsuzan is unknown.

However, it is found that Hatta Ituzan learned porcelain painting from master craftsman Sasada Yuzan (1840- 1914), or that Hatta was asked by pottery merchant Ennaka Magohei (1830-1910) to create the export kutani, or that master craftsman Ishino Ryuzan (1861-1936) was a disciple of Hatta. From these facts, it is thought that Hatta Itsuzan was active in the middle of the Meiji period.

In addition, the fact that the creation was asked by Ennaka and big pottery merchant Watano Kichiji, who carefully selected excellent Meiji kutani and exported it, shows that Hatta was one of the master craftsmen of Meiji kutani. In particular, his works with red and gold paintings or brocade are now inherited.

Hashida Yosaburo, a pair of colored sake bottles with a figure under pine tree

explanation of the work

The full surface of sake bottle has two panels framed with slightly thick black-gosu line. In the one, a person on the horseback is resting under a pine tree is drawn, and in the other, flowers and birds are drawn, and the bird is flying vigorously. This drawing is different from the style and color of Sano aka-e, especially, it uses a lot of neutral paints.

The composition of painting is similar to a bowl created by his compatriot, Kameda Sangetsu. The two creators were instructed by Araki Tanrei (another name is Kano Tanrei) and other Japanese-style painters to improve the quality of kutani painting and how to brush for it, so it seems that two works were influenced by the Kano school’s painting method.

size: caliber about 2.2 cm, torso diameter about 7.2 cm, height about 14.8 cm

In the large panel, a person on the horseback under a pine tree is drawn with a follower and the horse is drinking water at the water’s edge. The person has some elegance in the way he is dressed. On the other hand, the way of drawing pine has the power of the Kano school. The combination of the two is reminiscent of the Kano school’s painting style.

On the back side, a moving design is drawn, that is a bird flying vigorously among flowers in the smaller panel, some boats sailing on the sea, and a group of cranes flying. Two designs of the front and back seems be static and dynamic, so they are contrasted.

In addition, at that time, it was customary to give a pair of sake bottles, sake cups, and a set of three bowls as commemorative crafts or celebration crafts, on which cranes or sailboats were often drawn. They were adopted as an auspicious design because it was thought to be “crane carrying happiness” or “treasure ship”. In the Kaga region, since sailboats were reminiscent of the kitamae-bune (a sailing ship carrying agricultural and marine products, travelling to and from the Sea of Japan).

The back name is written as “kutani / painted Hashida”. It is said that the back name “painted by Hashida” was used only by the first Hashida Yosaburo, and from a certain time the first changed to the cursive script “Yosaburo”, and after that, the second and third wrote “Yosaburo” in the cursive script.

creator of the work

About the creator of the work, search for “Hashida Yosaburo, his works and history“.

 

reference No. 19042303
date of exhibition 2019.12.25
price 8440円
remarks wooden box

Hashida Yosaburo, three red and gold plates with Daikoku and Ebisu

explanation of the work

There are some differences between the three plates on which the designs of Daikoku god and Ebisu god (both are included in the Seven Lucky Gods) are drawn. Looking at Daikoku and Ebisu, the patterns, moldings, back names, etc., it is thought that each was one of the different sets.

Since Designs such as Daikoku or Ebisu were so common in Kutani that they were so common, It is believed that a master craftsman like Hashida Yosaburo changed the common design a little by incorporating his own knowledge about the design and pattern or the request from the pottery merchant. In addition, It is said that the shape or weight of the body might change if the production time changed.

size : diameter about 11.7 cm height about 2.5 cm

Generally, Daikoku is said to be the god of agriculture, and he has the image of carrying a large bag on his right shoulder and a gavel in his left hand on a rice bag. On the other hand, Ebisu’s image is that he has a fishing rod on his right shoulder and a sea bream in his left hand. However, all three small plates are a little different from that image. The differences are roughly as follows, including the following two images.

All three plates are common that Daikoku sits beside the rice bale and has nothing in his right hand. But two plates (plates ① and ②) raise their right hand, and the other (plate ③) puts his both hands on his knees. As for the fishing rod and sea bream that are typical of Ebisu, Ebisu in plate ① has not the sea bream.

On the plate ③ seems be drawn carefully as a whole, that is rice bale, large bag, and sea bream drawn in red are decorated with fine gold lines, and the facial expressions of Ebisu and Daikoku are gentle.

Tree plates are called as plate for namasu which is a dish of seafood or vegetables cut into small pieces and mixed with vinegar-based seasonings. The plates are warped toward the edge, but the plates ① and ② are a little steep, on the other hand, the plate ③ is a little loose.

In addition, the thickness of the body is different, and the weight is also different, such as 132g for plate ①, 119g for plate ②, and 96g for plate ③.

Their back names are written as “painted by Hashida”. However, plates ② and ③ are the correct character “橋 (hashi)”, but plate ① is incorrect. The reason is unknown.

The first Hashida Yosaburo initially wrote “painted by Hashida” and from a certain time changed it to the cursive script “Yosaburo”. After that, the second or third Hashida Yosaburo wrote “Yosaburo” in the cursive script.

creator of the work

About the creator of the work, search for “Hashida Yosaburo, his works and history“.

 

reference No. 19042309
date of exhibition December 25, 2019
price J-yen 10480
remarks wooden box

Hashida Yosaburo, his works and history

Hashida Yosaburo, his works

three red and gold plates with Daikoku god and Ebisu god

There are some differences between the three plates on which the designs of Daikoku god and Ebisu god (both are included in the Seven Lucky Gods) are drawn. (continued)

 

 

a pair of colored sake bottles with a figure and horse under pine tree

The full surface of sake bottle has two panels framed with slightly thick black-gosu line. In the one, a person on the horseback is resting under a pine tree is drawn, and in the other, flowers and birds are drawn, (continued)

 

Hashida Yosaburo, his history

Hashida Yosaburo  橋田 与三郎

born in 1851 and died in 1926

The first Hashida Yosaburo was born in Sano Village (now Sano Town in Nomi City). He became one of the disciples of Saita Isaburo (Dokai), who had already opened the Sano kiln for painting in 1835, and worked hard for eight years, studying porcelain painting, and polished skill of the fine painting of Sano aka-e (red painting).

After the death of Saita Isaburo in 1875, Hashida presided over the “15th Day Meeting of Sano Porcelain Painters” with Kameda Sangetsu and others, researched designs, pigments, etc., and taught young painters how to paint. He encouraged the villagers to paint and also taught them how to paint, His encouragement contributed to laying the foundation for the porcelain painting industry in Sano Village.

In addition, in 1876, Hashida and others invited as lecturers Nōtomi Kaijiro (Japanese-style painter, industrial designer and educator), Arakawa Tanrei (Kano school’s Japanese-style painter) and others to learn about porcelain designs and how to use pigments. In 1902, when he became the director of the painting department of the Kutani Ceramics Industry Association, he contributed to improving the quality of kutani through apprenticeship screening based on the apprenticeship examination system.

His painting style of Sano aka-e was inherited by the second Hashida Yosaburo and his disciples included Kitamura Yosamatsu and Nishino Jintaro.

Nishino Jintaro, colored and gold bowl with Hotei god and Chinese children

explanation of the work

The design of “Hotei and karako (Chinese children)” can also be seen in ink paintings, Kano school paintings, or ukiyo-e paintings. The scene of “Hotei god and karako is playing together” is drawn in this big bowl. The harmony between “Hotei with a harmonious appearance” and “karako playing innocently” is well combination, and it is thought that this bowl was made as lucky things when celebrating (birth of a child).

size ; diameter about 30.3 cm  height about 8.5 cm

“Hotei” was a real monk in the Tang dynasty, and in Japan, was added to one of the Seven Lucky Gods, because of the friendliness, commonness, etc., that everyone felt from Hotei.

When looking at Hotei, his facial expression, a smile, a wide forehead, a drum belly, and the appearance of a rough robe carrying a large bag, everything can be felt familiar. It seems that the way of life of Hotei loved by people overlaps with the growth of children.

The design of “karako” was introduced to Japan in the Tang dynasty, and it was called “child of Tang (country)”, and one day, by drawing a large number of children (boys), people wished for “wealthy prosperity” or “prolific prosperity”.

So, it seems that this work was made for good luck by combining “Hotei” as the god who controls the prosperity of wealth and many children who play well.

One of the highlights of this bowl is the solid molding without distortion. Nishino piled up the experience of potter’s wheel at the Kitade kiln which was popular for making the body. Even though the kilns for making the body had already been built by Saita Isaburo (Dokai) in Sano Village, Nishino Jintaro gained experience of potter’s wheel at the reputed Kitade kiln for some purpose.

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The back name is written as “kutani / produced by Nishino”.

creator of the work

Nishino Jintaro  西野 仁太郎

years of birth and death are unknown

Nishino Jintaro was a potter’s wheel at the Kitade kiln opened in 1868 in Sakae Village, Enuma County. This kiln was originally a kiln for making the body, and it became popular for its high-quality body, so, its name spread throughout the prefecture. Later, it was renamed the Sesen kiln, and added porcelain painting business. (He did not seem to be involved in the painting.)

After that, Nishino became one of the disciples of the first Hashida Yasaburo (1851-1926) who followed Sano aka-e in Sano Village, and then, he started the porcelain painting business independently, and produced works for the domestic market. According to the record, in 1913, Nishino was elected a representative of the domestic department of the Nomi Kutani Ceramics Industry Association.

 

reference No. 18111106
date of exhibition 2020.1.26
price sold out
remarks Images are posted with the kindness of the purchaser